Sure to Attract Much Attention: The Advertising Genius of Milton S. Hershey

Milton S. Hershey, the man behind the chocolate bar, was an innovative and resourceful manufacturer who used a variety of traditional as well as unconventional strategies to both advertise and attract attention to his products. He was born in Derry Township, Dauphin County, on September 13, 1857. After spending the first eight years of his life in Dauphin County, he lived 10 years in Lancaster...
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Editor’s Letter

In 2016 the Pennsylvania State Historic Preservation Office (PA SHPO) presented its first Community Initiative Awards to recognize organizations, agencies, municipalities and individuals throughout the commonwealth for their historic preservation successes. The program has become a key component of PA SHPO’s statewide historic preservation plan, #PreservationHappensHere, encouraging...
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In Chocolate We Trust by Peter Kurie

In Chocolate We Trust The Hershey Company Town Unwrapped by Peter Kurie University of Pennsylvania Press, 211 pp, cloth $34.95 A more impatient or typical writer than Peter Kurie would have taken the speedy route to writing the story of oft-visited but rarely understood Chocolate Town. A journalist could have plunged in, made a quick tour, surveyed the headlines and corporate tussles that...
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Dauphin County: Chocolates, Coal, and a Capital

Dauphin County celebrates its two hundredth anniver­sary this year. The events and themes that are the history of the county reflect the experience of Pennsylvania and the United States. Dauphin County has never been a homogeneous commu­nity; indeed, it is difficult to consider it as a single commu­nity. From the beginning it has comprised individuals of diverse ethnic, national and religious...
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George H. Danner: The Retailer and His Relic Rooms

In the early 1930s Milton S. Hershey established an Indian Museum in the town which he had built around his chocolate factory. Like the town’s amusement park, ornate theater and fa­mous Starlight Ballroom, the museum was provided as a source of enjoyment and recre­ation for Hershey’s workers and their families. In 1935, in a move which broadened the focus of the original Indian...
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An American Indian Museum for Mr. Hershey’s Model Town

Hershey. Sixty years ago this Dauphin County commu­nity was a cozy, well-planned company town, replete with its very own amusement park, grand hotel, handsome community building, opulent theater, sports arena, and neat rows of well-kept houses for the factory workers of Chocolate­town, U. S. A. The air hung thick with the delicious aroma of cocoa, making the little town seem an even more...
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Shorts

A major exhibition of stylish cre­ations reflecting the changing fashions of designer hats through the years will open at the James A. Michener Art Museum on Saturday, January 19, 2002. Beginning with a rare circa 1780 calash (a folding bonnet) of silk and taffeta, Stylish Hats: 200 Years of Sartorial Splendor pro­vides a colorful tour through the history of hat making during two centuries....
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Torchere by L. Straus and Sons

Eight years after it dazzled visitors to the 1893 World’s Columbia Exposition in Chicago, a magnificent torchere created by L. Straus and Sons, New York, was purchased by Pennsylvania candymaker Milton S. Hershey (1857-1945). The electric torch – with nearly fourteen hundred separate pieces – was the largest composite article in cut glass produced to that time. Crafted by some...
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The Value of Pennsylvania History

George W. Bush won the presidential election of 2000 because the fifty states cast more electoral votes for him, even though more people actually voted for his opponent, Albert A. Gore Jr. The election reminded Americans about a curious institution called the Electoral College, and an equally peculiar system known as federalism in which each state conducts elections according to distinct laws...
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Mr. Hershey’s Advice

Boys, if you ever make any money, for God’s sake, keep it!” I remember the advice given by candymaker Milton S. Hershey at the depth of the Great Depression in the 1930s to his “white, male orphans” at a Hershey Industrial School assembly. For more than sixty years I have remembered and tried, although not always successfully, to follow his rec­ommendation. On another...
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