A King Crowns the World’s Greatest Athlete

On a sun-drenched July afternoon in 1912, thirty thousand spectators thronged the closing ceremonies of the fifth Olympiad held that year in Sweden’s capital of Stockholm. The event was quite a spectacle, punctuated by pomp and circumstance befitting a royal pageant. The stadium, especially constructed for the games, was electric with excitement. As a chorus of four thousand voices filled...
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New Sweden and The New World – History Lessons From the Morton Homestead

Years before William Penn and his Quaker followers set foot on America’s shores, Swedish settlers had established a settlement along the Delaware River and Bay. On this land, now part of both Pennsylvania and Delaware, stands the Morton Homestead, an emissary from a past, an emissary that tells the story of a powerful Swedish king, a white, sandy shore and primeval forest, peaceful fur...
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Penn Landing

Not long after he received the charter for Pennsylvania from King Charles II in March 1681, founder William Penn (1644–1718) thought it prudent to travel to the New World to consolidate his claims and exercise his legal authority. In anticipation, he appointed William Markham (1635–1704) deputy governor and issued a proclamation instructing the colony’s inhabitants to transfer allegiance from...
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Aiming for the Stars: The Forgotten Legacy of the Westinghouse Astronuclear Laboratory

Before his death, renowned science fiction writer, inventor, and futurist Arthur C. Clarke (1917–2008) confidently declared the space age had not yet begun, and would only commence when reliable nuclear-powered space vehicles become available to drastically reduce the cost of moving humans and heavy payloads from the surface of the earth to the farthest reaches of the solar system. It is a...
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