Lost and Found

Lost Completed in 1910, the Community Inn in Hershey, Dauphin County, originally housed the Hershey Store Company and the Hershey Inn. In 1920 the store moved out, and in 1936 Hershey architect D. Paul Witmer redesigned the structure, adding two floors. The newly named Community Inn provided tourist accommodations, a grill, and a very popular oyster bar. Refurbished in 1958, it was renamed the...
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Lorraine Apartments

The Lorraine Apartments was among Philadelphia’s earliest high-rise apartment houses. Designed by Philadelphia architect Willis G. Hale (1848-1907), the ten-story building, built in 1892-1893 in the heart of the burgeoning nouveau riche neighborhood of North Broad Street, exemplified the rapidly changing possibilities of urban life that swept across the country at the time. Its innovations...
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Fred Waring (1900-1984)

In her 1997 book, Fred Waring and the Pennsylvanians, Virginia Waring declared her late husband “The Man Who Taught America How to Sing.” In his foreword to the book, Robert Shaw (1916-1999), world-famous choral conductor known for his classical and secular repertoire, wrote, “It is certain to me that tours of the Bach B Minor Mass and the Mozart Requiem would not have been...
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Letters

Saintly Connections The feature story on Saint Katharine Drexel was brilliantly written by William C. Kashatus [“Philadelphia’s Sainted Katharine Drexel,” Summer 2007]. This article is of great interest to our Keating family and others here in northeastern Pennsylvania. My aunt, Esther Keating, of Pittston, Luzerne County, was educated in nursing at the University of...
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“In Immortal Splendor”: Wilkes-Barre’s Fugitive Slave Case of 1853

On Saturday morning, September 3, 1853, U.S. Federal Marshal George Wynkoop of Philadelphia and two deputies, John Jenkins and James Crossen, sat down to breakfast in the dining room of the Phoenix Hotel on River Street in the Luzerne County seat of Wilkes-Barre. At the far end of the room was a handsome, powerfully built mulatto named Bill (or, according to various newspaper accounts, known as...
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Executive Director’s Letter

In the final version of the 2009–2010 state budget, the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC) lost more than 30 percent of its funding. The severity of the reductions we face is unprecedented. Our operating budget was reduced by $6.3 million; the Keystone Fund allocation that supports historic preservation grants to non-profits and ongoing preservation of PHMC historic sites and...
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Pennsylvania Heritage Society Newsletter

Topics in the Winter 2010 Newsletter: Friends of the State Museum Launch Major Campaign: Buy-a-Bone Columbia Gas Hosts School Groups for Special Energy Tour Calendar for January – March 2010 In the Next Edition Pennsylvania Governors Speakers Series Teaching American History Grant New Wind Exhibit Welcome New Membership Coordinator Holiday Marketplace 2009 Welcome New PHS Members Annual...
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Executive Director’s Letter

Steep budgetary cuts this past year forced the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC) to make difficult decisions, resulting in drastic reductions in staffing and operating hours at nearly every facility. We have temporarily closed several historic sites and museums while we work with local groups to find new operating models that will provide as much accessibility as possible with...
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Black History in Pennsylvania: An Overview

One of the more enduring outcomes of “Black History in Pennsylvania: Communities in Common,” the annual theme adopted by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC) for 2010, is a history study that examines more than three centuries of African American life, culture, and experience in the Keystone State. This expansive document explores, in detail, the daily life, work, struggles,...
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From the Editor

As the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC) moves towards the conclusion of its 2010 theme, “Black History in Pennsylvania: Communities in Common,” at the end of this year, I am pleased that Pennsylvania Heritage continues to play an ongoing role. Readers will discover even more about the Keystone State’s African American heritage and culture in regularly...
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