Larger than Life Along the Lincoln Highway

What are unsuspecting motorists’ typical reactions when they encounter a seven-foot praying mantis standing alongside a highway? Or a giant shoe, three stories tall? How about a huge steamboat, complete with paddlewheels, miles from navigable waterways? They might range from exclamation – “wow!” – to sheer dis­dain – “tourist trap!” – but the...
read more

Letters to the Editor

A Culinary Crisis In the article “Larger Than Life Along the Lincoln Highway” in the summer 1995 issue of your magazine, author Brian A. Butko described shoofly pie as “a traditional ‘Pennsylvania Dutch’ dessert made with molasses, raisins, and brown sugar.” My ethnic background is Pennsylvania Dutch (without the quotation marks) and, happily, I grew up eating...
read more

Letters to the Editor

“Dapper Dan” My congratulations on an outstanding issue of Pennsylvania Heritage for summer 1995! I have watched the magazine grow and mature, and this issue was the best yet. I was particularly impressed with the piece entitled “‘Dapper Dan’ Flood, Pennsylvania’s Legendary Congressman” by William C. Kashatus III. In 1960, President John F. Kennedy...
read more

Letters to the Editor

Coke and Coal “A Jewel in the Crown of Old King Coal: Eckley Miners’ Village,” an article by Tony Wesolowsky in the winter 1996 edition, prominently mentions John Leisenring. In 1880, Leisenring, as head of the Connellsville Coke and Iron Company, began construction of Leisenring Number 1 Works, followed by Leisenring Number 2 (Bute), and Leisenring Number 3 (Monarch) on...
read more

Letters to the Editor

Home Again Like many others who grew up in the hard coal region in the 1950s, I couldn’t wait to finish high school and leave the area. When I went away to college, I vowed never to return. Yes, I did go back for funerals and weddings and the like, but I couldn’t wait to leave again, to get as far away as possible from the giant culm banks and the coal dust. I devoted myself to my...
read more

Bookshelf

The Lincoln Highway by Brian A. Butko Stackpole Books, 1996 (321 pages, paper, $16.95) Established in 1913, the Lincoln Highway became the first automobile roadway to cross the United States. It stretched east from New York’s Tunes Square to San Francisco at a time when rural roads were little more than rutty wagon paths. The Lincoln Highway Association was organized “to procure the...
read more

Bridging the Past for the Future

Because Pennsylvania was one of the first settled areas of the United States, it should come as little surprise that it possesses one of the most interesting collections of historic bridges of any state. Its ever-expanding population and consequent transportation requirements made the Keystone State a pioneer in transportation innovation, particularly in the design of bridges. Following the...
read more

Lost and Found

Lost So much has changed since historian Brian A. Butko wrote The Lincoln Highway (1996) that Stackpole Books will publish a revised edition in 2002. Mid-twenti­eth-century businesses along the coast-to-coast highway, including gasoline stations and drive-in movie theaters, are rapidly being replaced by huge shopping plazas and sprawling housing developments. One of the most recent causalities...
read more

Letters to the Editor

Brick-End Barns Upon receiving the Winter 2002 edition of Pennsylvania Heritage, I was fascinated to see “Lost & Found,” showing a fanci­ful brick-end barn in Lancaster County that was, unfortunately, demolished for the building of an outlet mall. I have discovered a brick-end barn still standing in Antrim Township, Franklin County, that is similar to the one illustrated. In...
read more

Lost and Found

Lost For nearly seventy years, the S.S. Grand View Ship Hotel near Reels Corners, Bedford County, amazed, amused, and awed motorists traveling the Lincoln Highway. Sailing high along a ridge of the Allegheny Mountains, the landlocked ocean liner was the brainchild of Herbert Paulson, who launched the famous tourist attraction in 1932 On opening day, “Captain” Paulson welcomed aboard...
read more