Holtwood Dam

  In October 1905 McCall’s Ferry Power Co. began construction in Martic Township, Lancaster County, on what would be the second of four hydroelectric dams built to harness the power of the Susquehanna River below Harrisburg, Dauphin County. Twenty miles from the tidewater of the Chesapeake Bay, it was then the third longest dam in the world, built of solid concrete, 55 feet high. The...
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Grave Sites, Petroglyphs, and Relics: The Turn of the Century Archaeology of David Herr Landis

Thousands of years ago, travelers from northeastern Asia­ – ancestors of Native Americans – followed the animals they hunted into what had once been inaccessible regions of Alaska. Over the newly-formed land bridge at the Bering Strait they came, eventually spreading across the North American continent, including the territory that became Pennsylvania. In the Commonwealth, as...
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Advanced Technology “Rubs” the Ancient Past

With more than 400,000 visitors, the Pennsylvania Farm Show, held each January, is a terrific opportunity to highlight the best of Pennsylvania agriculture. It’s also an exciting venue to showcase Pennsylvania archaeology and remind the public that archaeological sites are important endangered resources that need protection. Since 1980, PHMC’s Bureau for Historic Preservation and The...
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Photograph of Holtwood Hydroelectric Power Plant

Early twentieth-century proponents of hydroelectricity favored this type of power for a number of reasons: its cost is relatively low, water is a renewable resource, and it does not cause pollution since it does not use fossil fuels. In addition, hydroelectric plants are in operation longer than fossil fuel facilities, require fewer workers, and have lower maintenance costs. A photograph of the...
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When the Susquehanna River Was Pennsylvania’s Flour Highway

The flour trade industry in the Susquehanna River watershed is one of the lesser known stories in Pennsylvania’s history, but it is among its most significant sagas. Millers were among the first tradesmen to arrive in the New World to sustain the settlers. The Keystone State’s rich farmlands produced abundant flour for local and regional markets with a consistent surplus for export to foreign...
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Letters

A Room with a History Yesterday’s mail brought the latest edition of Pennsylvania Heritage, and I enjoyed the article on Mira Lloyd Dock [“‘With a Woman’s Instinct’: Mira Lloyd Dock, The Mother of Forestry in Pennsylvania,” by Bill McShane, Winter 2010]. One note of interest that may intrigue your readers is that the photograph of the class of 1910 and staff...
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