Currents

Great Greek Following six years of extensive gallery and storage area renovations, The Univer­sity Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Philadel­phia, has recently reopened its exhibition space devoted to ancient Greek civilization. This new exhibit, entitled “The Ancient Greek World,” offers visitors a broad overview of the history and culture of ancient Greece and its colonial...
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Keeping the Torch of Justice Burning Brightly: William P. Young

He faced criticism at his appointment, confronted adversity in his duties, and battled poor health in his later years, but he kept the torch of justice burning brightly for all to see, maintaining his dignity and poise at every turn. He was William Pennington Young (1895-1968), the Keystone State’s fifteenth secretary of labor and industry, from 1963 to 1967, during the administration of...
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Masonic Temple, Butler, Pa.

The Keystone State Library Association, established in 1901, selected the Butler County seat of Butler in western Pennsylvania for its fifteenth annual meeting in October 1915, and one of the reasons is obvious. Librarians would convene for their first session in the community’s grand Masonic Temple, completed four years earlier. Butler Lodge Number 272, Free and Accepted Masons (F&AM),...
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All Creatures Great and Small: The Western Pennsylvania Humane Society’s Revolution of Kindness Reformed Society and Improved Lives

On a cold February morning in 1965, Donora Mayor Albert P. Delsandro took his daily stroll in the Washington County community’s Palmer Park and made a shocking discovery. Thirteen dead dogs, each with amputated ears, lay in the tall, yellowed grass. A little-known Pennsylvania stray dog law authorized a $2 bounty for every pair of grisly trophies sent to Harrisburg. Countless citizens expressed...
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A Modest Fountain on the Square

The modest appearance of a squat granite fountain hunkered along the curb on the south side of Philadelphia’s Washington Square belies its noble history. The fountain, which began in a much grander form on the opposite side of the square in 1869, was the first project of a sweeping movement that would adorn the city’s streets and quench the thirst of its residents, both man and beast. It was the...
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Artifacts from Immaculate Conception Church

Northeastern Pennsylvania’s anthracite (or hard coal) region traces its rich religious diversity to the late nineteenth century, when many newly-arrived ethnic groups established their own neighborhoods and communities, giving rise to a large number of Catholic, Greek, Byzantine, Orthodox, and Protestant churches. The first wave of immigrants, the Welsh, was largely Protestant, but later groups,...
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