Currents

Exciting Erie Before the arrival of white settlers, the southern shores of Lake Erie were inhabited by the Eriez Indians of Iroquois stock until they were virtually eliminated, by 1655, through war with the Seneca nation. A century later, the French, recognizing the military and trade advantages that Lake Erie and its waterways offered, found a harbor ideally suited for a fort, which they named...
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Currents

Hello, History! The former Chautauqua Lake Ice Company warehouse in Pittsburgh’s historic Strip District will come to life on Sunday, April 28 [1996], when it officially opens to the public as the Senator John Heinz Pittsburgh Regional History Center. Renovated by the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania, which has been protecting, preserving, and interpreting the history of the...
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Erie Maritime Museum

Discover Pennsylvania’s newest museum – and rediscover the Commonwealth’s exciting maritime history! With the U.S. Brig Niagara as its centerpiece, the Erie Maritime Museum examines the events leading to the War of 1812 and, specifically, the Battle of Lake Erie, during which Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry defeated the British while in command of the Niagara under the famous...
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Currents

Setting Sail One of Pennsylvania’s most exciting museums-and certainly its newest-will open its doors during the Memorial Day weekend (see “Executive Director’s Message” in the spring 1998 edition). The Erie Maritime Museum, with the U.S. Brig Niagara as its centerpiece, will join more than two dozen historic sites and museums along the well-traveled Pennsylvania Trail of...
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Letters to the Editor

Flight Right A friend has passed along a copy of the Summer 2001 issue of your excellent magazine. It is thus a little late to be commenting on the article by Neal Carl­son [“Taking Flight! Pittsburgh’s Gate­way to the Skies”] on Pennsylvania Central Airlines, which became Capital Air­lines in 1948. I write as one who has researched and written about that airline in several...
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The Value of Pennsylvania History

George W. Bush won the presidential election of 2000 because the fifty states cast more electoral votes for him, even though more people actually voted for his opponent, Albert A. Gore Jr. The election reminded Americans about a curious institution called the Electoral College, and an equally peculiar system known as federalism in which each state conducts elections according to distinct laws...
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Lost and Found

Lost Even though she had been altered through the years, the Motor Vessel Niagara, launched in 1897, had been recognized by the mid-1990s as a rare and significant example of a late-nineteenth-century Great Lakes freighter. She first carried pulpwood and, from 1900 to 1925, hauled coal and ore. In 1927, she was converted for dredging. The Erie Sand Steamship Company purchased the Niagara in 1959...
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Susquehannocks, Catholics in Seventeenth-Century Pennsylvania

With its seemingly endless vistas of shopping malls, housing developments, technology parks, truck terminals, and warehouses, it’s hard to imagine Pennsylvania’s lower Susquehanna River valley a vast, undisturbed wilderness. Yet, little more than two centuries ago, the region was home to a group of Native Americans generally called the Susquehannocks, but also known as the Minqua, the Andaste,...
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