Lost and Found

Lost Strained by the weight of nearly a half-million pounds of snow during what has become known as the Winter of 1994, the century-old Mount Gretna Playhouse collapsed in February. The historic open-air theater was built in the Lebanon County summer resort in 1892 by carpenter John Cilley, a self­-taught engineer. Measuring one hundred feet in diameter and shaped like an umbrella, the...
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Lost and Found

Lost Following World War II, the United States Steel Corporation’s massive Homestead Works in Allegheny County employed nearly fifteen thousand work­ers. The sprawling works, site of the infamous Homestead Steel Strike of 1892, closed in July 1986 and demolition began soon after. But all is not lost. While much of the plant is gone, there are plans to pre­serve the Pinkerton Landing, site...
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Lost and Found

Lost Completed in 1878 and opened for business the following year, York’s City Market House was designed by the city’s preeminent architec­tural firm of J. A. Dempwolf. The sprawling structure’s edi­fice was constructed of pat­terned bricks and trimmed with decorative stone; its tower was designed to recall the dis­tinctive tower of the Palazzo Vecho in Florence, Italy. In...
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Lost and Found

Lost Opened in July 1929, the Hershey Park Pool­ – actually a combination of four swimming pools, including one for toddlers – held nearly one and a quarter million gallons of filtered spring water and mea­sured thirty-five thousand square feet! Virtually an engi­neering feat, the main pool (photographed in the early 1930s) was built in two sections. The handsome bathhouse, with tile...
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Lost and Found

Lost Conceived and funded by industrialist and philanthropist Henry Phipps (1839-1930), the Phipps Conservatory in Pittsburgh’s Schenley Park opened, without ceremony, in December 1893. The original complex – which cost more than one hundred thousand dollars – was designed and erected by Lord and Burnham of Irving­ton-on-the-Hudson, New York, a firm noted for its construction...
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Lost and Found

Lost In operation between 1910 and 1916, the studio of filmmaker Siegmund “Pop” Lubin, located at Twentieth Street and Indiana Avenue in North Philadelphia, employed seven hundred people in its heyday. Dubbed “Lubinville” by the press, it was one of the largest and most ad­vanced motion picture studios of its day. The studio featured a glass enclosed stage area large...
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Lost and Found

Lost Harrisburg’s Senate Hotel, designed by architect Miller Isaac Kast in an elegant French Beaux Arts style, was opened by hotelier James Russ in 1906. In a successful nomination to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982, it was described as “the finest com­mercial … building in the City of Harrisburg.” Preservationists treasured its handsome facade for the...
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Lost and Found

Lost The Crestmont Inn, for many years the grandest hotel in the summer colony of Eagles Mere, Sullivan County, was a self-contained resort that offered its affluent guests a wide variety of activities, including tennis, swimming, bowling, croquet, badminton, and golf, in addition to concerts, dances, and bridge tournaments. Perched on a mountain top overlooking the spring-fed Eagles Mere Lake,...
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Lost and Found

Lost Designed in 1886 by acclaimed American architect Frank Furness (1839-1912), the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company’s passenger station in Philadelphia was largely completed within two years. The terminal, photographed in 1929, was located at Twenty-Fourth and Chestnut Streets. Passenger service from this grand depot ceased in 1958. Following a fire, the building was demolished in...
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Lost and Found

Lost Crossing Ten Mile Creek, southeast of Amity in Washington County, the Bailey Covered Bridge was erected by Bailey Brothers in 1889. The bridge has often been cited as a fine example of the Burr arch truss style, designed by Theodore Burr of Torringford, Connecticut, which enabled the spanning of wider streams and rivers. The Bailey Covered Bridge was destroyed by arson in July 1994 when a...
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