History is Alive and Well in Beaver County

On June 6, 1824, the steamboat Ploughboy with the first contingent of Harmony Society members came around the bend in the river at Legionville; the skipper gave a cannon salute. After dropping anchor, the passengers disembarked and made camp. The following day, Father Rapp, leader of the Harmonists, wrote to the remaining members at New Harmony: “I consider this place the most healthful in...
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From the Editor

Rae Tyson, who has written recent features on early Quakers and the history of motorsports in Pennsylvania, now offers us a snapshot of the photographers who descended on the Adams County battlefield shortly after the epic struggle ended. Rae is uniquely qualified to write “At the Gettysburg Battlefield with Traveling Photographers.” Among the prominent photographers noted –...
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From the Editor

Learning about energy – its history, its present-day uses, and its future – has never been easier. For years, Pennsylvania has been a leading supplier of traditional energy sources – water, wind, anthracite and bituminous coal, oil, and lumber – and many of PHMC’s historic sites and museums, among them Drake Well Museum at Titusville and the Pennsylvania Anthracite...
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“Atoms for Peace” in Pennsylvania

In 1957, Shippingport, along the Ohio River in far western Pennsylvania, became home to America’s first commercial nuclear power plant under President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s “Atoms for Peace” program. Just two decades later, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) converted the Beaver County plant to a light water breeder reactor that successfully demonstrated the feasibility...
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Photograph at Shippingport Atomic Power Station

A photograph labeled “Installation of the Final Closure Head,” taken at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, Beaver County, on October 10, 1957, is part of an important new accession documenting the construction and evolution of the world’s first full-scale atomic power plant devoted exclusively to peacetime use received by the Pennsylvania State Archives (PSA) on April 14, 2009. The facility...
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Aiming for the Stars: The Forgotten Legacy of the Westinghouse Astronuclear Laboratory

Before his death, renowned science fiction writer, inventor, and futurist Arthur C. Clarke (1917–2008) confidently declared the space age had not yet begun, and would only commence when reliable nuclear-powered space vehicles become available to drastically reduce the cost of moving humans and heavy payloads from the surface of the earth to the farthest reaches of the solar system. It is a...
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