Delaware County: Where Pennsylvania Began

Delaware County is part of the densely populated belt around Philadelphia, stretching from the city’s western boundary to the circular Delaware state line. Covering approx­imately 185 square miles, it is the third smallest Pennsylvania county yet the fourth largest in population. Its southern boundary is formed by the Delaware River, from which the county takes its name. The site of early...
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Shorts

The seventeenth annual Conference on Black History will be conducted by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission on Friday and Saturday, May 13-14, 1994, in Erie. The theme of this year’s event is “African Americans at Work in Pennsyl­vania.” For additional information, write: 1994 Conference on Black History, Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, P. O. Box...
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Heritage Highlights

Pennsylvania Anthracite Heritage Museum, Scranton Exhibit: “Illustrating an Era: The Life and Work of Photographer John Horgan, Jr., 1859-1926”, through March 1994 Old Economy Village, Ambridge “Gartenfest”, May 14-15, 1994 Joseph Priestley House, Northumberland “Oxygen Day” Celebration, August 1, 1994 Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania, Strasburg Lecture:...
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Some Questions for Examining Pennsylvania’s Black History

Civil rights activist Julian Bond was born in Nashville, Tennessee, in January 1940. When he was five years old, his father, Dr. Horace Mann Bond, was named the first Black president of Lincoln University, Chester County, the country’s oldest private African American college. Bond’s family lived on the campus of Lincoln University until 1957, when Dr. Bond was appointed dean of the...
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Heritage Highlights

Bushy Run Battlefield, Jeanette Native American Quillwork Workshop, February 25, 1995 Drake Well Museum, Titusville Old Fashioned Engine Start-up Day, April 29, 1995 Fort Pitt, Pittsburgh Royal American Regiment Parade of the Soldier, April 2, 30, 1995 Colonial Fair at the Point, May 6-7, 1995 Graeme Park, Horsham Native American Cultural Festival, April 29, 1995 Living History Day, June 4, 1995...
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Bookshelf

Saved for the People of Pennsylvania: Quilts from The State Museum of Pennsylvania by Lucinda Reddington Cawley, Lorraine DeAngelis Ezbiansky, and Denise Rocheleau Nordberg Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, 1997 ($14.95, paper, 67 pages) Since its founding in 1905, The State Museum of Pennsylvania has collected nearly two million artifacts and objects which docu­ment and interpret...
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The Difference This Day Makes

On February 1 of this past year, a day of crisp blue skies and mild chill, voices swelled above the Liberty Bell as they have every first day of February for the last fifty-five years. With prayer and in song – and in remembrance, determination, and hope – African Americans in Philadelphia celebrated National Freedom Day, the anniversary of the signing of the Thirteenth Amendment to...
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Executive Director’s Message

“The State Museum of Pennsylvania is one of the nation’s preeminent institutions of its kind.” So concluded a report prepared as part of the national museum accreditation program conducted by the American Association of Museums (AAM). The State Museum of Pennsylvania first received accreditation in 1987, and the recent study confirmed that “in virtually every area the...
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“To Do Good and Love Mercy”: A Conversation with C. Delores Tucker

C. Delores Tucker was only a young girl when, because of her color, she was refused seating at a lunch counter in Detroit. The incident marked the beginning of a life devoted to advancing the cause of minority groups in this country. Born in Philadel­phia in 1927, the daughter of the Reverend Whitfield and Captilda (Gardiner) Nottage, she had lived her childhood in a multi­cultural environment...
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From the Peace Corps to Americorps: An Interview with Harris Wofford, Torchbearer for National Service

In an inaugural address that has become a poignant reminder of the idealism of the mid-twentieth century, President John F. Kennedy chal­lenged Americans to “ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.” By throwing down the gauntet, he inspired a strong sense of national purpose and pride among the American people. His New Frontier programs...
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