Innovative African Americans in Pennsylvania History

“Once [I was arrested] for standing in the road to prevent trucks from entering a housing construction site where no Blacks were employed, [and] a second time for leading a demonstration against a slum landlord [by conducting a prayer service in the street].” Those are the words of LeRoy Patrick (1915– 2006), minister, civil rights leader, former member of the Pennsylvania Historical and...
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Pennsylvania’s War Governor

On September 14, 1862, Pennsylvania’s Governor Andrew Gregg Curtin invited the governors of the northern and border states to a meeting to be held at Altoona, Blair County, in ten days. The purpose of the meeting that became known as the Loyal War Governors’ Conference — or, simply, the Altoona Conference – was to “take measures for a more active support of the government’s prosecution of...
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Mr. Peanut’s Hometown: Wilkes-Barre and the Founding of Planters Peanuts

Few may realize it, but for nearly a half-century, the Luzerne County seat of Wilkes-Barre, in northeastern Pennsylvania, was the peanut capital of the world. Founded in 1906, the Planters Peanut Company operated its national headquarters at 632 South Main Street in an impressive two-story Federal-style building. A handsome balustrade encircled the roof of the elegant concrete edifice and was...
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St. Mary’s Church and Convent

“Scene from typewriting room window. Much enjoyed on hot days during typewriting period (much more so than the typewriters),” wrote Josie Johnson to a Miss M. L. Elliott of Detroit, Michigan, on the front of a postcard dated July 30, 1908. The back of the card indicates that Johnson was a student and Elliott a teacher. The postcard depicts a landmark in St. Marys, Elk County, in...
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