“With a Woman’s Instinct”: Mira Lloyd Dock, The Mother of Forestry in Pennsylvania

On a frosty December night in 1900, Mira Lloyd Dock (1853–1945) presented an illustrated lecture to the Harrisburg Board of Trade entitled “The City Beautiful.” Using vivid descriptions and dramatic images, Dock contrasted the “roughness, slime and filth” of the state capital and the Susquehanna River with the well-kept cities and rivers of other American states and European nations. She...
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Letters

A Room with a History Yesterday’s mail brought the latest edition of Pennsylvania Heritage, and I enjoyed the article on Mira Lloyd Dock [“‘With a Woman’s Instinct’: Mira Lloyd Dock, The Mother of Forestry in Pennsylvania,” by Bill McShane, Winter 2010]. One note of interest that may intrigue your readers is that the photograph of the class of 1910 and staff...
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From the Editor

Welcome to the Winter 2011 edition – and volume 37 of Pennsylvania Heritage! It’s sometimes difficult to believe the magazine is nearing its fortieth anniversary, especially when we look back at the early issues which were quite modest. But time marches on and so do we. This issue offers a preview of the annual theme for 2011 adopted by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum...
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Wood on Glass: The Lumber Industry Photographs of William T. Clarke

William Townsend Clarke (1859–1930) photographed the forests of northcentral Pennsylvania during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, producing stunning images that tell the story of the logging industry in the vast stands of old-growth white pine and hemlock trees which Henry W. Shoemaker (1880–1958) called the “Black Forest” of Pennsylvania. Shoemaker was a prolific writer,...
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This Is a Beautiful, Bountiful Earth: Joseph Trimble Rothrock and the Preservation of Penn’s Woods

The lush, verdant woodlands characteristic of Pennsylvania’s landscape are almost entirely second-growth forests, in existence roughly for less than a century. Had it not been for the groundbreaking work of many conservationists in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the Keystone State’s present terrain would be dramatically different. One of the most important of those...
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Letters

William Penn’s Legacy As a lifelong resident of the City of Brotherly Love, I enjoyed the essay by John Fea [“William Penn’s Pennsylvania: A Legacy of Religious Freedom,” Winter 2011], which intelligently addresses what he describes as the tension between Penn’s original vision for the colony and the attempts to adhere to those ideals in the everyday life of the province....
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