Coal Patch, Take Two: The Preservation of Eckley Miners’ Village

“A ghost town surrounded by strip mines.” That was how Eckley was described in the 1960s, a far cry from its heyday in the late 1800s when the coal-mining “patch town” had boasted a population of 1,500. At Eckley’s peak, more than 350 men and boys were engaged in mining nearly 144,000 tons of anthracite coal a year from local seams. By the 1960s, however, mining...
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A Jewel in the Crown of Old King Coal: Eckley Miners’ Village

It survives – somewhat miraculously – as a vestige of Pennsylvania’s coal mining heritage, a link in what was once a chain of little coal communities, or patch towns, that dotted the anthracite region. “Eckley is part of the puzzle, but not a unique part. There were numerous, almost identical, mining patch towns like Eckley,” explains Vance Packard, site...
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Saving Eckley Miners’ Village One Building at a Time

Settled in 1854, Eckley Miners’ Village, ten miles east of Hazleton in southern Luzerne County, is a rare survivor of the hundreds of company mining towns or “patches” that punctuated northeastern Pennsylvania’s anthracite region in the nineteenth century. Mining companies created the settlements so that employees would live near the collieries – complexes...
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