Forester Gifford Pinchot Becomes Governor, 100 Years Ago

Gifford Pinchot (1865–1946) was elected twice to the highest executive office in Pennsylvania. He served two nonconsecutive terms as governor, 1923–27 and 1931– 35. This photograph was taken at his first inauguration on January 16, 1923, by the Philadelphia Public Ledger, a daily newspaper published from 1836 to 1942. The image shows Pinchot taking his oath of office on a temporary raised dais...
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Pennsylvania Heritage Foundation Newsletter

Topics in the Fall 2022 Newsletter: PHF Expands Committee Work to Support PHMC Programs PHF Announces New Board Member Curators Highlights Documents in Collections John Fielding  on Eckley Scrapbooks   PHF-newsletter...
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Other Recent Releases

Abandoned Eastern Pennsylvania Remnants of History by Cindy Vasko America Through Time, 96 pp., paperback $23.99 Vasko adds Eastern Pennsylvania to her growing series of books featuring her stunning photography of abandoned buildings and places throughout the Northeastern U.S. (her Abandoned Western Pennsylvania was published in 2019). In addition to well-known locations such as Eastern State...
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Philadelphia Stories by C. Dallett Hemphill

Philadelphia Stories People and Their Places in Early America by C. Dallett Hemphill; edited by Rodney Hessinger and Daniel K. Richter University of Pennsylvania Press, 349 pp., hardcover $35 This original and captivating book was a labor of love, both for its author, the late C. Dallett Hemphill, and the 13 scholars who came together to finish the almost complete manuscript Hemphill had left...
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Community Initiative Awards for 2021

The Pennsylvania State Historic Preservation Office (PA SHPO) has announced the winners of its Community Initiative Awards to recognize accomplishments made in 2021. These awards acknowledge the hard work and dedication of outstanding organizations, municipalities, agencies and individuals whose work is advancing and expanding the definition of historic preservation in Pennsylvania. The awards...
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Lenape Homecoming at Pennsbury Manor

Over the course of four days this past April, the remains of approximately 180 Lenape ancestors were reinterred at Pennsbury Manor, the reconstructed home of William Penn near Morrisville in Bucks County. The ceremony brought together leaders of all five federally recognized tribes of the Lenape diaspora: the Delaware Nation of Oklahoma, the Delaware Tribe of Indians (Oklahoma), the...
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Repopulating and Managing Black Bears in Pennsylvania

Three species of bears inhabit North America: black bears, polar bears and brown bears (including Alaskan brown bears and grizzlies). The only bear living in the eastern United States, and one that is thriving in Pennsylvania, is the American black bear (Ursus americanus). Pennsylvania’s bear population as of 2022 is estimated to be around 16,000, the result of sound, science-based wildlife...
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Repressing Disease in Cattle: The Career of Pennsylvania Veterinarian Leonard Pearson

In 1900 there were 224,248 farms and nearly a million dairy cows in Pennsylvania. The livelihood of dairy farmers depended almost entirely on the health of their cows. Dairy cows were vulnerable to a variety of diseases, but the most feared was tuberculosis. In Pennsylvania, bovine tuberculosis killed more cows than any other infectious disease, and it often destroyed entire herds. Bovine...
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A Full-Circle Moment: Three Pittsburgh Institutions Work to Secure August Wilson’s Legacy

August Wilson seemed perturbed when he met journalist Abiola Sinclair for a May 1990 interview in his favorite nook in the lobby of New York’s famed Edison Hotel. This candid session, published later in New York Amsterdam News, included the exasperated playwright’s charge that — despite having four of his American Century Cycle plays performed on Broadway — his work had not received the...
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A Place for All: Three Stories of Integration in Pennsylvania

The American Civil Rights Movement focused public attention on segregation in the South and the laws and practices that kept Southern Blacks disenfranchised. By the late 1950s places such as Montgomery, Alabama; Little Rock, Arkansas; and Greensboro, North Carolina, had become household names in the battle to dismantle the racial caste system of “Jim Crow.” But discrimination based on race, much...
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