In King’s Shadow: Bayard Rustin and the 1963 March on Washington

On Wednesday, August 28, 1963, a quarter-million African American and white civil rights activists walked the one-mile length of the National Mall from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial to rally for better jobs and freedom for the nation s blacks. The signature event of the March on Washington occurred in the late afternoon when the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his...
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Dishing It Up with William Woys Weaver

The Lamb Tavern, built in 1805 in Devon, Chester County, was restored in the early twentieth century by R. Brognard Okie (1875-1945), the historical architect responsible for the re-creation of Pennsbury Manor at Morrisville, Bucks County (see “Okie Speaks for Pennsbury,” Part I: Fall 1982 and Part II: Winter 1983). Entered in the National Register of Historic Places in 1984, the...
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William C. Kashatus: Bringing History to Life

A Man for All Centuries “Freedom hath been hunted round the globe. Asia and Africa hath expelled her. O, receive the fugitive and prepare it for all mankind!” exclaims William C. (Bill) Kashatus with fists stabbing the air. In this instance, Bill is passionately portraying Thomas Paine (1737–1809), the bellicose British radical who advocated the American Revolution. Much of Bill’s passion...
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Star of the West, Tent No. Six

A national organization of African American women, the Grand United Order of Tents, J. R. Giddings and Jolliffe Union, was founded in 1847 and named for Congressman Joshua Reed Giddings (1795–1864), of Ohio, and his law partner, prominent abolitionist John Jolliffe (1804–1868). Today, the organization aids education and medical research and provides housing for the elderly, but an early goal was...
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Losing the Way by Horace Pippin at State Museum of Pennsylvania

A native and resident of West Chester, Chester County, Horace Pippin (1888–1946) was a self-taught artist who rose from poverty to become one of the nation’s most important African American artists, even though he is known to have created less than 150 works of art. He was severely wounded during World War I and lost much of the use of his right arm. Nevertheless, after the war and despite his...
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Bookshelf

Archbishop Patrick John Ryan: His Life and Times: Ireland — St. Louis — Philadelphia, 1831–1911 by Patrick Ryan published by AuthorHouse Press, 2010; 357 pages, paper, $11.60 Upon the death of Patrick John Ryan (1831– 1911), Archbishop of Philadelphia for more than a quarter century, church bells throughout the city solemnly tolled to mark the passing of the remarkable Irish-born prelate. Ryan...
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