The Erie Warner: From Movie Palace to Movie House to Civic Center

Once upon a time, brightly lit marquees of movie palaces of Pennsylvania’s streets dazzled the eyes of pleasure seekers. Today, the genre, described as possibly “the most dis­tinctly American contribution to archi­tectural history,” is all but extinct. And when a survivor is found, as on Erie’s State Street, the structure is a reminder of the gaudy and the phony, the...
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Chin Up, Smile, Keep ‘Em Happy!

With the construc­tion of movie palaces through­out Pennsylvania in the years immediately fol­lowing World War I, ushering – quite ordinary employment in the days of the nickelodeon – became a much-sought-after vocation. For it was then that movie house showmen first pronounced that service was the “personality” of show business, and that ushers were an individual...
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Lost and Found

Lost In operation between 1910 and 1916, the studio of filmmaker Siegmund “Pop” Lubin, located at Twentieth Street and Indiana Avenue in North Philadelphia, employed seven hundred people in its heyday. Dubbed “Lubinville” by the press, it was one of the largest and most ad­vanced motion picture studios of its day. The studio featured a glass enclosed stage area large...
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