“With a Woman’s Instinct”: Mira Lloyd Dock, The Mother of Forestry in Pennsylvania

On a frosty December night in 1900, Mira Lloyd Dock (1853–1945) presented an illustrated lecture to the Harrisburg Board of Trade entitled “The City Beautiful.” Using vivid descriptions and dramatic images, Dock contrasted the “roughness, slime and filth” of the state capital and the Susquehanna River with the well-kept cities and rivers of other American states and European nations. She...
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This Is a Beautiful, Bountiful Earth: Joseph Trimble Rothrock and the Preservation of Penn’s Woods

The lush, verdant woodlands characteristic of Pennsylvania’s landscape are almost entirely second-growth forests, in existence roughly for less than a century. Had it not been for the groundbreaking work of many conservationists in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the Keystone State’s present terrain would be dramatically different. One of the most important of those...
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From the Editor

Editing every edition of Pennsylvania Heritage is exciting to me because with each new issue, I learn more about our storied past. The spring editions, however, are even more intellectually invigorating because we devote the major features and most of the regular departments to our annual theme. In this issue we explore the Commonwealth’s beauty and bounty as we underscore “The Land...
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Lancaster’s Central Market

A circa 1920 image of Lancaster’s Central Market, drawn from Glass Lantern Slides of Pennsylvania Market Houses in Record Group 1, Records of the [Pennsylvania] Department of Agriculture, is one of many in the custody of the Pennsylvania State Archives, Harrisburg. Designed by James H. Warner, an English-born architect, and erected in 1899 near the city’s Penn Square, the market is...
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Stewards of the Land

Penn’s Woods possesses a rich agrarian heritage and its inhabitants have long borne an abiding stewardship for the land, a time-honored conviction that remains deeply embedded in the more than sixty-three thousand farming families that call Pennsylvania home. From the fertile landscape sprouts a $57 billion economic endeavor that supports one in seven jobs, making agriculture the...
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Bookshelf

Mrs. Goodfellow: The Story of America’s First Cooking School by Becky Libourel Diamond published by Westholme Publishing, 2012; 288 pages, cloth, $26.00 Married and widowed three times, Elizabeth Baker Pearson Coane Goodfellow (1768–1851) owned a popular bakery and sweet shop in Philadelphia during the first decades of the nineteenth century. In addition to catering to the city’s wealthy...
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