Current and Coming

Constitution Center Drawn up by nearly five dozen dele­gates to the Constitutional Convention held in Philadelphia during the swelter­ing summer of 1787, the Constitution of the United States is a system of the nation’s fundamental laws, defining distinct powers for the Congress, the president, and the federal courts. Ratified by the states the following year, the Constitution offers a...
read more

Mary Cassatt (1844-1926)

“I took leave of conventional art. I began to live.” Mary Cassatt told her first biographer, Achille Segard, about her invitation in 1877 to join artists she regarded as “true masters.” Before she was accepted as one of America’s most famous im­pressionist artists, Cassatt first had to conquer Paris. Born on May 22, 1844, in Allegheny City, now part of Pittsburgh,...
read more

Sculpture by Harriet Whitney Frishuth

A native of Philadelphia, Harriet Whitney Frishmuth (1880-1980) earned an enviable niche in early twentieth-century art circles with her sensitive, lithe sculptures of the female form in extended poses. Not long after her parents Louise Otto Berens and Frank Beroni Frishmuth separated, the young Frishmuth and her older two sisters sailed with their mother to Europe, where the girls attended...
read more

Edward Drinker Cope, Pennsylvania’s Greatest Naturalist

Despite Americans’ age-old fascination with dinosaurs, probably few recognize the name Edward Drinker Cope (1840-1897). Although his name may not be as familiar as others in the long record of natural history – John James Audubon, John and William Bartram, Louis Agassiz – he has earned bis rightful place among America’s most accomplished and eminent natural scientists....
read more

Out and About

American Etchers Abroad Beginning in the early 1880s, a large number of American artists set out for foreign lands. Europe offered travel abroad, opportunity to study great works of art, and instruction from master artists. Many were drawn to the graphic art of etching. With etching tools in hand, they explored Europe, Asia, and North Africa, and recorded their impressions of sites and people....
read more

Susquehannocks, Catholics in Seventeenth-Century Pennsylvania

With its seemingly endless vistas of shopping malls, housing developments, technology parks, truck terminals, and warehouses, it’s hard to imagine Pennsylvania’s lower Susquehanna River valley a vast, undisturbed wilderness. Yet, little more than two centuries ago, the region was home to a group of Native Americans generally called the Susquehannocks, but also known as the Minqua, the Andaste,...
read more

The Last of the New Hope Crowd: Faye Swengel and Bernard Badura

While Faye Swengel Badura (1904-1991) is remembered and collected as a fine artist, her husband Bernard “Ben” Badura (1896-1986) is increasingly being recognized as one of the most important makers of frames in the United States. In fact, his frames – works of art in themselves — have far eclipsed the desirability of his accomplished paintings. The couple was a fixture of the art colony at...
read more

Cyclorama Building

A landmark among the approximately 1,328 monuments, memorials, and markers at Gettysburg National Military Park (GNMP) since its dedication on November 19, 1962, the ninety-ninth anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, the Cyclorama Building was designed by architects Richard Neutra (1892–1970) and Robert E. Alexander (1907–1992). Neutra moved to the United States in 1923...
read more

George Nakashima House, Studio, and Workshop

George Nakashima (1905–1990) was an internationally acclaimed Japanese American architect, modern furniture designer, and woodworker, who won numerous awards for his work and his furniture. He was a leading innovator of twentieth-century furniture design and a father of the American craft movement. He was born in Spokane, Washington, to Katsuharu and Suzu Nakashima, and grew up in the forested...
read more

A Trio of Philadelphia Maritime Painters

Oceans and seas have long challenged civilization’s adventurous spirit. Sailors and their ships have struggled against billowing winds and sweeping tides, as well as fires, piracy, collisions, and warfare. All of this has been celebrated in story and song — and in works of art. Artists of the day captured both the beauty and the rigors of those wonderful ships in their coveted canvases. Three of...
read more