“With a Woman’s Instinct”: Mira Lloyd Dock, The Mother of Forestry in Pennsylvania

On a frosty December night in 1900, Mira Lloyd Dock (1853–1945) presented an illustrated lecture to the Harrisburg Board of Trade entitled “The City Beautiful.” Using vivid descriptions and dramatic images, Dock contrasted the “roughness, slime and filth” of the state capital and the Susquehanna River with the well-kept cities and rivers of other American states and European nations. She...
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Giving a New Shine to an Old Boot and Shoe Factory

Named for Tahkamochk (or Tam-a-kwah), a Tuscarora Indian chief of the Turkey Clan, Tamaqua, in northeastern Pennsylvania’s Schuylkill County, was known as the “the land where the beaver dwells in the water” and “the valley among four mountains.” It began as an anthracite (hard coal) mining town with related manufacturing interests. Tamaqua’s first settler, Burkhart Moser, is credited with...
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United Brethren Church, Mechanicsburg

“X Indicates my home,” wrote C. K. on a postcard, post- marked August 18, 1909, depicting the United Brethren Church in Mechanicsburg, Cumberland County, to a Miss Hazel Sterner of Selinsgrove, Snyder County. “This is the church I attend. This is located along the trolley line to Harrisburg and near the center of town. I have lived here 20 years and am used to it. Mabel sends her regards.”...
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Wood on Glass: The Lumber Industry Photographs of William T. Clarke

William Townsend Clarke (1859–1930) photographed the forests of northcentral Pennsylvania during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, producing stunning images that tell the story of the logging industry in the vast stands of old-growth white pine and hemlock trees which Henry W. Shoemaker (1880–1958) called the “Black Forest” of Pennsylvania. Shoemaker was a prolific writer,...
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Executive Director’s Letter

The continuing success of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC) is the result of the high level of public participation and support for history by the commonwealth’s citizens. Many of PHMC’s Pennsylvania Trails of History destinations remain open because of dedicated volunteers and their willingness to take on unprecedented levels of responsibility for these treasured historic...
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Executive Director’s Letter

The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC) is pleased to announce Governor Tom Corbett’s appointment of Andrew E. Masich as Commission chair. He is well-known in the museum field and is president and CEO of the Senator John Heinz History Center in Pittsburgh. Since 1998, he has provided leadership for the 275,000-square foot History Center and its staff of 125, as well as the...
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The Mills Brothers Trace Roots to Bellefonte

Most musicologists agree: The internationally renowned Mills Brothers was the greatest vocal group of the twentieth century, a conclusion supported by mounds of evidence and unprecedented “firsts” in the world of entertainment. These family singers were the pacesetters, style blazers, and patternmakers in their field, and the first African American performing artists to attract a...
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Sampling a Taste of the Past Along the Pennsylvania Trails of History

One of the best ways to experience the Keystone State’s history and heritage is to travel the Pennsylvania Trails of History®, a network of two dozen exciting historic sites and museums administered by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC), the Commonwealth’s official history agency. PHMC has organized its popular destinations into four main trails – Military...
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A Century of Wine: Viniculture of the Harmony Society

The Harmony Society was a religious communal group that immigrated to the United States in 1805 from Württemberg, Germany. Members established their first home just north of Pittsburgh in the small community of Harmony, Butler County, near Zelienople. After ten years the Harmonists moved to the Indiana Territory and established their second community which they also called Harmony, now known as...
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