Into the Woodlands

Rarely does his name enjoy prominence in horticultural history, but William Hamilton (1745-1813), owner of The Woodlands, a picturesque eighteenth-century countryseat on the banks of the Schuylkill River in West Philadelphia, made sev­eral significant contributions that forever changed the landscape of North America. An avid plant collector he filled his English-style garden with as many new...
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Letters to the Editor

Nellie Bly Thank you for the most interesting “Pro­files” in the Winter 2003 edition featur­ing Nellie Bly. The article failed to men­tion, however, that Nellie Bly was recent­ly honored with a commemorative thir­ty-seven-cents-postage stamp by the United States Postal Service (USPS). According to Francia G. Smith, vice president and consumer advocate for the USPS, “the Postal...
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Jeffrey B. Johnson, A Connoisseur of Color

One of the first things you notice about Jeffrey B. Johnson — in addition to his easy smile and dulcet voice — are his hands. As he passionately speaks about his work, he often gestures and it’s hard not to take note of his thin, elegant fingers. They belong to a master craftsman. Johnson, who lives in Harrisburg, is an exceptionally talented conservator, paint analyst, gilder, designer, artist,...
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Cremation’s Fiery Beginnings

Franz Lee Rickaby (1889–1925), a bone-thin man of thirty-five, was a much-loved professor of English and drama at Pomona College in Claremont, California, when he died of rheumatic fever. An adventurous wanderer, he left a respected historical legacy with folklorists when Harvard University posthumously published his collection of songs of the Midwest lumberjack, Ballads and Songs of the...
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