Pithole City: Boom Town Turned Ghost Town, An Interview with James B. Stevenson

One hundred and twenty-five years ago this summer, the placid calm of northwestern Pennsylvania’s sparsely populated but panoramic vista was ruptured when “Colonel” Edwin L. Drake’s well coughed up rich, black crude oil on August 28, 1859. The following boom years of the oil industry gave rise to numerous towns and cities, some of which were short-lived ghost towns. The...
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Some Questions for Examining Pennsylvania’s Black History

Civil rights activist Julian Bond was born in Nashville, Tennessee, in January 1940. When he was five years old, his father, Dr. Horace Mann Bond, was named the first Black president of Lincoln University, Chester County, the country’s oldest private African American college. Bond’s family lived on the campus of Lincoln University until 1957, when Dr. Bond was appointed dean of the...
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Lost and Found

Lost Opened in July 1929, the Hershey Park Pool­ – actually a combination of four swimming pools, including one for toddlers – held nearly one and a quarter million gallons of filtered spring water and mea­sured thirty-five thousand square feet! Virtually an engi­neering feat, the main pool (photographed in the early 1930s) was built in two sections. The handsome bathhouse, with tile...
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