You Can Go Home Again: An Interview with James A. Michener

James A Michener is a man of diverse talents, boundless energy, and seemingly countless interests. He is naturally inquisitive, passionately curious. He is fascinated by the world around him and the people who inhabit it. He collects stories about far-away places as effortlessly as one gathers seashells on the shoreline in summer. He is the Ultimate Con­noisseur. Of people. Of places. Of things....
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Currents

Grown and Sown For two centuries following the founding of Pennsylvania by William Penn in 1681, the lives of most Chester County citizens were tied to the land. “Grown in Chester County: The Story of Nineteenth Century Farming,” mounted by the Chester County Historical Society at its History Center in downtown West Chester, tells the story of early countians who accepted the...
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Out and About

American Etchers Abroad Beginning in the early 1880s, a large number of American artists set out for foreign lands. Europe offered travel abroad, opportunity to study great works of art, and instruction from master artists. Many were drawn to the graphic art of etching. With etching tools in hand, they explored Europe, Asia, and North Africa, and recorded their impressions of sites and people....
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The Last of the New Hope Crowd: Faye Swengel and Bernard Badura

While Faye Swengel Badura (1904-1991) is remembered and collected as a fine artist, her husband Bernard “Ben” Badura (1896-1986) is increasingly being recognized as one of the most important makers of frames in the United States. In fact, his frames – works of art in themselves — have far eclipsed the desirability of his accomplished paintings. The couple was a fixture of the art colony at...
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From the Editor

With this issue, the staff and I are pleased to present the third feature in our series devoted to commemorating the seventy-fifth anniversary of the New Deal in Pennsylvania, PHMC’s annual theme for 2008. For more than a decade, author David Lembeck — whose enthusiasm for the murals created for post offices during the New Deal is nothing less than infectious — has researched these works...
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Rediscovering the People’s Art: New Deal Murals in Pennsylvania’s Post Offices

On a February morning in 1937, artist George Warren Rickey (1907-2002) and a group of four men met at the post office in Selinsgrove, Snyder County. Armed with cloth-covered rolling pins, the men attached Rickey’s mural entitled Susquehanna Trail to one of the lobby’s end walls. After six hours, they transformed the entire blank white wall, from marble wainscoting to ceiling, into a...
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