Sixty Seasons – and Counting! A History of the Philadelphia Eagles, 1933-1993

It began rather humbly about a century ago in small western Pennsylva­nia towns, when former college players-longing for a taste of past glories – joined in community pick-up games. Yet professional football eventually exploded into a multi-million dollar sport that brought to its stadiums and playing fields throngs of frenzied and worshipful fans. Both the Keystone State and adjacent Ohio...
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Josh Gibson, The Heartbreak Kid

The kid tapped his bat on Yankee Stadium’s home plate and tugged at the sleeves of his gray visi­tors’ uniform, revealing biceps “built like sledge ham­mers.” Before him, the stadi­um’s left field roof, with its famous gingerbread lattice facing, soared one hundred and eighteen feet into the air some four hundred feet from home plate. The scene was the World Series...
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A King Crowns the World’s Greatest Athlete

On a sun-drenched July afternoon in 1912, thirty thousand spectators thronged the closing ceremonies of the fifth Olympiad held that year in Sweden’s capital of Stockholm. The event was quite a spectacle, punctuated by pomp and circumstance befitting a royal pageant. The stadium, especially constructed for the games, was electric with excitement. As a chorus of four thousand voices filled...
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A Champion for All Seasons

Wearing a high-necked dress with puffed sleeves and narrow waist, Lizzie Stride (1877-1919) looks like the perfect Gibson girl, the idealized American young woman of the 1890s created by popular illustra­tor Charles Dana Gibson (1867-1944) and copied at the turn of the century by scores of commercial artists. Like the Gibson girl – images of whom eventually appeared on early automobile...
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Keeping the Torch of Justice Burning Brightly: William P. Young

He faced criticism at his appointment, confronted adversity in his duties, and battled poor health in his later years, but he kept the torch of justice burning brightly for all to see, maintaining his dignity and poise at every turn. He was William Pennington Young (1895-1968), the Keystone State’s fifteenth secretary of labor and industry, from 1963 to 1967, during the administration of...
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Marking Pennsylvania’s African American History

Charged with collecting, preserving, and interpreting more than three centuries of the Keystone State’s history and culture — as well as millions of years of its prehistory — the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC) has launched a number of widely acclaimed, innovative, and popular public history programs over the years. One of its most popular is the state historical marker...
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The Pottsville Maroons, Cheated Again and Again

Pottsville, like many communities in the Roaring Twenties, was a rugged, hard-living, hard-working city. The small Schuylkill County seat in northeastern Pennsylvania was best known for the booming anthracite industry and D. G. Yuengling and Son, established in 1829 and touted as America’s oldest family-owned brewery. Coal mining had been good to Pottsville, crowned the Queen City of the...
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Bookshelf

Palace of Culture: Andrew Carnegie’s Museums and Library in Pittsburgh by Robert J. Gangewere published by the University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011; 332 pages, cloth, $35.00 Andrew Carnegie (1835–1919) is remembered as one of the world’s great philanthropists. As a boy, he witnessed the benevolence of Colonel James Anderson, a prosperous iron maker, who opened his personal library of several...
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