Lost and Found

Lost A century after its erection in 1870, and just one year after it was named to the National Register of Historic Places, Old Main, a landmark on the campus of what is today West Chester University of Pennsylvania in Chester County was demolished – despite protests by local, county, and state historical organizations, architects, even the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The...
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Lost and Found

Lost Battleship Number 38, the third vessel christened USS Pennsylvania, was launched in March 1915. Between stints in World War I and World War II, she served as a flagship and took part in fleet exercises. USS Pennsylvania sustained only minor damage in the December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor, where she was dry-docked. After assisting in eight World War II campaigns, the ship was...
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Lost and Found

Lost The splendid Humane Fire Engine Company building was erected in 1854 on Airy Street in Norristown, Montgomery County. This fire company was the first in the county to purchase a steam fire engine in 1865, and its building was distinguished by its impressive fire alarm bell tower. The engine house served the community until 1888, when a new building, still in use, was constructed on Main...
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Lost and Found

Lost The round barn was an unusual form of farm building. Although praised by advocates for providing maximum floor space, increased storage, and inexpensive construction costs, few were actually built. Of three erected in Centre County, the James Beck Round Barn in Spring Mills, Neff Township, was capable of housing twenty head of livestock. Constructed in 1913 by Aaron Thomas of Centre Hall,...
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Lost and Found

Lost Schuylkill County’s first official courthouse was erected in Orwigsburg in 1815, four years after the creation of the county. The building, enlarged in 1846, housed government offices until 1851, when the county seat was moved to Pottsville. Three years later, the Arcadian Institute occupied the building, but the academy failed. In 1873, a group of investors organized the Orwigsburg...
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Lost and Found

Lost The Smithton Bridge spanning the Youghiogheny River was fabricated in 1900 by the Pittsburgh Bridge Company and erected by Nelson and Buchanan, a Chambersburg, Franklin County, contracting firm which acted as an agent for the com­pany. An important engineering landmark, the Smithton Bridge was an example of a suspended cantilever truss, introduced in the United States about 1885. Such...
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Lost and Found

Lost Described as “an influential organization of artists and citizens,” the Philadelphia Art Club was housed in a building designed in 1892 by architect Frank Miles Day (1861-1918). The building was the first significant commission for Day, who had just returned from studies in Europe, which explains his use of unusual expansive arches, delicate stone window lintels, ornamental...
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Lost and Found

Lost Charles Bailey built a log barn in the Potter County seat of Coudersport in 1900. He employed the most primitive log-building technique, using logs in their natural round shape which he joined together with simple saddle notches, requiring them to extend beyond each corner in a rustic manner. An oddity for its time, Bailey’s twentieth-century barn appeared more rustic and primitive...
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Lost and Found

Lost In 1891, a conservatory was erected on the grounds of the State Capitol in Harrisburg. Re­ferred to as “the first State Botanical Conservatory,” it was commonly called the “Rose House” – even by Joseph M. Huston, architect of the present Capitol. The prefabricated conservatory was purchased from the Joseph A. Plenty Horticultural and Skylight Works, New York....
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Lost and Found

Lost Opened in 1938, the Bangor Park Swimming Pool was built by the Works Progress Administration and the Borough of Bangor, located in Northampton County’s “slate belt.” Its design, conceived by architect Wesley Blintz, was unusual: instead of being dug into the ground, the huge pool was built above the ground, and locker rooms, lobby, and concession stand were tucked below...
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